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Ever since I first heard about Amazon Prime’s upcoming TV series, I’ve been cautiously optimistic. There is so much potential for it to be great, but as anybody who has watched The Hobbit movies will know, it could also go horribly, horribly wrong. This week, the first synopsis of the TV series was released. I have a few general thoughts about the setting and timing of the series, but when I was considering what I might write, I started to wonder, “What does Amazon’s Lord of the Rings series mean for tabletop games?”

In case you haven’t seen it, you can find the initial press release statement here; I also read this article on Den of Geek which might help whet your speculative juices. …


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When my daughter expressed an interest in learning the piano, we resisted the urge to buy her her own keyboard because, well, even older children lose interest in a new hobby sometimes. Instead, we passed on our 12-year-old electric piano keyboard from Yamaha that was gathering dust in my wife’s office. While my daughter did benefit from this, it did run into some issues with being out of tune, not being able to connect to devices, and generally being outdated tech. So, when the fine folks at Yamaha offered me a review unit, we decided to see if it was an improvement, and how much it helped. …


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For quite a while now, there have existed digital platforms that allow you to play board games and roleplaying games online. Often called “virtual tabletops,” they rely on programmers to recreate games in a wholly digital format, so that you can play with people over the internet. However, if there is a particular game that you want to play, you have to either hope that someone has already done the work of bringing that game onto a particular platform like Tabletopia or Tabletop Simulator, or you need to possess the time and coding skill to do the work yourself.

But what if there was a virtual tabletop where you could take a board game that you owned, and, without any programming skill, you could bring that game online to play with your friends? …


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Hope you’re enjoying that fresh scent of “new year” while it lasts. It smells like new opportunities, a fresh stack of books, with just a hint of excessive optimism that you always hope will linger a bit longer. You know what that means: it’s time for our annual reading resolutions!

Today, we’re sharing our hopes and dreams for 2021-at least when it comes to our reading habits. Here are the books we’re looking forward to, or the ones we’ve been meaning to read for a while but just haven’t made the time. Here are the ways we hope books will shape the world around us, or the way we understand it. …


I’ve played every installment of The Room, the puzzle/adventure game series from Fireproof Games. Some of them I’ve even played twice, involving my daughter as she got old enough.

So when I recently got an Oculus Quest 2, I was downloading The Room VR: A Dark Matter even before my fellow puzzle enthusiasts suggested it. It was the first experience, after showing my daughter Tilt Brush, that I tried out with the headset.

I can not describe how magical it is.

This episode doesn’t make any radical gameplay changes: you’ll have to fiddle with knobs and put things in their proper place and solve some somewhat tricky puzzles while using magic lenses to see invisible things, all while following a story about people discovering the deadly Null element. …


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Games of all sorts frequent our posts, reviews, and culture in general. It’s no surprise that we have a great list of suggestions for you this year. Read on for our favorites in both tabletop and video gaming.


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Relive the exciting parts of James Cameron’s megahit , and find out if there really was room for Jack on that door, in Spin Master’s Titanic: The Game.

What Is Titanic: The Game?

Titanic: The Game is a game for 2–5 players, ages 12 and up, and takes about 40 minutes to play. It is currently available for purchase from Amazon and your friendly local game store.

Note: As an Amazon affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Titanic: The Game was designed by Daryl Andrews and Adrian Adamescu and published by Spin Master Games, with illustrations by Judit Tondora and Mat Edwards.

Titanic: The Game Components


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Welcome to the Playmobil Playland, where we take a peek inside those impressive blue boxes and see what treasures await within. Sometimes we’ll have step-by-step photos walking you through assembly, maybe we’ll discuss and review a particular set or theme, or maybe we’ll have an unboxing video.

Our kids love advent calendars and getting a small gift every day leading up to Christmas, and this year we get to continue our annual tradition with not one but two different Playmobil advent calendars-Back to the Future and Christmas in the Townhouse. …


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Ever since I learned how to fold a paper airplane as a Cub Scout in my youth, I have enjoyed trying different designs for a variety of functions such as distance, speed, and aerobatics. I even chose to teach how to fold paper airplanes for my demonstration speech in a public speaking class in college. However, I never envisioned putting powered propellers on a paper airplane let alone turning one into a remote control aircraft.

What is PowerUp 4.0?

PowerUp 4.0 is the latest version of PowerUp Toys remote controlled paper aircraft. Unlike earlier versions, PowerUp 4.0 is powered by two propellers rather than only one. The First Flight kit sells for $79.99 and the Flight Manual Bundle which includes a book with directions for 10 unique designs as well as additional templates is available for $99.99. Other bundles which include additional parts or lights for night flights are also available. Currently shipping is free for orders of $99 or more. All of these products can be ordered directly from PowerUp Toys. …


Nothing quite defines geeks like their affinity for gadgets and toys. Regardless of our specific geekdom, we often find ourselves ogling some cool new tech toy or handy gadget to make our lives more fun. This year it appears that our contributors have been wooed by a plethora of items. Below we present part two of our gadgets and toys guide.

Disclosure: Some of the links below may be affiliate links. This means that the contributor (or GeekDad) may make a small amount of commission if you click through and purchase the item at no extra cost to you. We may have also received the item for review from the manufacturer, and this in no way influences our opinions. …

About

GeekDad

Geeks and parents from all over the world, writing about what we love. Read all our content at geekdad.com and geekmom.com. Support at patreon.com/geekdad.

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